Four Weeks to Penn Relays – My Training Plan

After peaking for Indoor Nationals a week ago, I planned to take a week off. Usually I am good at following through with my own workout schedule, especially when it calls for not working out, but for some reason I ended up going fairly hard this past week. I think it was due to a) feeling stoked about such a fun weekend in Landover, and b) feeling more or less still in tact and injury free. Sometimes, as I am learning, listening to your body means to NOT rest (how strange after having to learn the opposite in so many hard ways).

So last week looked like this:

Monday: Rest
Tuesday: 5×300 @ 1:00 with easy 500m jog rests (Steady state sub-threshold work)
Wednesday: Rest
Thursday: 3x2x400 (400-1:00 rest-400, with 8:00 rests between sets) @ 1:20/1:20, 1:15/1:15, 1:10, 1:10.
Friday: Rest
Saturday: 6×400 @ 1:20, 1:15, 1:10, 1:05, 1:00, 1:10 with about 5-6 minute rests
Sunday: Rest

Based on the success of last week, I am now planning to go fairly hard for two more weeks, kick back a little for a week, and then fine tune with some short speed work leading up to the Wednesday before Penn (racing Saturday afternoon). This formula has worked well for me in the past. I have found that its one thing to taper before an A race, but if I go hard until the week before, I am often too beat up to feel really fresh for race day. I discovered the formula, by accident, last year. Three weeks before Penn I strained my calf muscle. I took a week off, then spent a week working back easy, and then did three race-prep workouts. It was not ideal, but I felt awesome when race day arrived. I decided to experiment by resting for a week two weeks before my next race, and I set a new pr. I do not think this would be ideal for a younger athlete, but my 43 year-old legs seem to really appreciate it.

So here is my rough plan for the next four weeks.

Week of Monday, April 1:
Monday: Sit and Kicks: 600-300-500-200-400 @ 90% with last 100m of each rep at 100%.
Thursday: Speed and power drills, 3×150 speedmakers, 3×20-40-60.
Friday: 5x3x200 with increasing speed and decreasing rest. Set times: 34,33,32,31,30. Set rests: 1:45, 1:30, 1:15, 1:00, :45.

Week of Monday, April 8:
Monday: Splits: 1×100-100-100, 1×150-150-100, 1×200-200 all at goal race pace with 1:00 rests between reps, 8:00 rests between sets.
Wednesday: 3×600 with 200m segments @ 32-40-30, with 5:00 rests.
Friday: Speed and power drills, 3×150 speedmakers, 3×20-40-60

Week of Monday, April 15:
Monday: 5x3x200 (see above), with adjustments based on progress.
Wednesday: light jog, light drills, stretch
Friday: light jog, light drills, stretch

Week of Monday, April 22 (Race Week!):
Monday: Delvin’s Race Prep: 3×100 @ 15,14,13. 2×150@22,21. 1×300@42

    Wednesday: 1×300@39 (goal race split).
    Saturday: 54.75 split in 4×400!

    One detail that is not represented in the above plan is the speed work that I do with a metronome. This is very experimental, and I have not been able to find any research to support it, but on the days when I do the 150 speedmakers, and on my final race prep days, I will begin the reps with more of a focus on turnover (cadence) than time. For example, I will do the first 150 with an acceleration to c:110 (counting one leg), then bump it up to 115 on the next, and see if I can get to 120 on the last. Using Allyson Felix as a model (why not?) as well as a lot of good high school runners, a cadence of 115 seems ideal for the 400 meters. At this time, I am not even close to maintaining that for an entire race (the video from Millrose showed that I was at 107 at the 200 and barely over 100 in the last 50!) However, I am making progress, and I truly believe it is at least partially the reason I have pr’d four times in the last year. Another workout where I incorporate this concept is the one listed above for Monday, April 1 — doing various distances at 90% with a the final 100 meters at 100%. I will switch on the metronome to 115 when I began the final 100 and try to match it. To put this into perspective, last spring, every single kid that qualified for states in South Jersey Groups 3 and 4 (larger schools) was well over 115 in his last last 100 of the 400, and the places somewhat correlated to who maintained a higher cadence — not across the board, but enough to capture this coach’s attention. At first, one might think fitness is the issue; the faster runners are more prepared and therefore have more left at the end. However, training for cadence is much different than training for endurance; a person can run all the mileage he wants and still have abysmal turnover if he doesn’t specifically work on it. Turnover, or cadence, is more about brain wiring than physical conditioning.

    So that pretty much sums up my next four weeks. Feel free to comment here or on the Greater Philadelphia TC facebook page to discuss ideas, get tips, etc.

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